Australian English Genealogy

Descendants of Daniel Smallwood

Notes - Page 2


7. Daniel James Smallwood

OBITUARY.

The death of Mr. Daniel James Smallwood, a very old and respected resident of Caddai Greek, took place at his residence recently, at the advanced age of 78 years. The deceased had resided at Caddai all his life, and was well known throughout the Hawkesbury. He leaves a wife and family of grown-up sons and daughters, who are scattered over the State. The funeral took place on Monday and was largely attended. The remains were conveyed to Ebenezer Presbyterian Cemetery by boat and the long string of boats that followed formed quite an imposing sight. At the church the hymn " Rock of Ages" was sung, and a very impressive address was delivered by the Rev. A. Dandie, who officiated at the grave. The remains were placed in a leaden coffin, the outside casket being of handsomely polished cedar. The funeral arrangements were carried out by Mr. Thomas Primrose.
Source: Windsor and Richmond Gazette 2 Feb 1901


26. Daniel J Smallwood

A FARMER'S SUICIDE.

WINDSOR, Thursday.

A farmer named Daniel Smallwood, of Caddai, committed suicide by cutting his throat with a pocket-knife on Tuesday night. From the tone of a letter which deceased left it would appear that something was preying on his mind. He was a single man, 57 years of age, and a highly respected member of the community.
Source: The SMH 3 May 1907

A Farmer's Suicide.
Worry Over Other People's Troubles.
A Well-liked Man.
The sad death of Mr. Daniel James Smnllwocd, a well-to-do and much respected farmer of Caddai, beyond Pitt Town, was accompanied by peculiar circumstances. Deceased was 57, and unmarried. His sister was housekeeping for him, and she was the last to see him alive. That was on Tuesday night. Next morning one of the brothers (Mr. W. J. Smallwood) called for him. They had been working together on the Tuesday, and parted with the understanding that they would finish the job next morning, and then go together to a sale. But to the surprise of the-brother and sister, they found, when calling at the room next morning, that deceased was not there. The brother found him in a shed; about fifty yards from the house, with his throat cut from ear to ear, and a pocket knife lying beside. He was dead, but the body was still warm. A parcel of bank notes was found, with a note on top, addressed to the sister, in which deceased asked to forgiven, and explained why he was about to put an end to himself. It appears there had been a dispute with the neighbours over a certain beast. Several were branding their calves all together, and one was branded by mistake. His brother-in-law, Mr. Tom Miller, claimed the beast as his, and the brand was put on accordingly. But Mr. J. H. Johnston claimed it as his, and removed the calf to his property. Miller went to Johnston to get the beast back; and a row ensued. Johnston then summoned Miller, charging him with abusive language, and also illegally branding. This worried deceased, who said it was all through his mistake; and he took it upon himself to come and settle the case. But Miller objected. He would sooner have fought it out. Coming to a settlement, he contended; was a kind of admission that they were guilty of the illegal branding, and would blacken the character of both. This aspect of the complication then began to worry deceased . Evidently he lay for hours on Tuesday night, stewing it all over, till as he said in, the note, 'he could not help it.' And so, at 7.30 next morning, they found the unfortunate man dead. Mr. J. B. Johnston hold a magisterial inquiry, and the finding was 'self-inflicted.' The remains were interred in the old Ebenezer cemetery on Friday afternoon. The Rev. David Baird officiated, and Mr. J. W. Chandler was the undertaker. There are four brothers and three sisters of deceased in this district, and for them we are sure the public have a deep sympathy. Deceased was a fine big man, well liked, and in good circumstances, the owner of eight 40-acre blocks, houses, and stock.
Source: The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers' Advocate 8 May 1907


46. Esther Matilda Smallwood

OBITUARY
MISS ESTHER M. SMALLWOOD
AN old identity of Pitt Town, Miss Esther Matilda Smallwood, passed away in the Windsor Hospital on Wednesday, 10th instant, at the age of 70 years. She was a daughter of the late James Smallwood, was born at Maraylya and had lived in the district all her life. Miss Smallwood had not been enjoying good health for some time past, and was a patient in hospital for two or three weeks' prior to her death. - Mr. James Smallwood, of the Post Office, Maraylya, is a brother of the deceased, whilst a sister, resides at Annangrove. The remains were interred . in the Church of England cemetery, Pitt Town, on Thursday, Rev. S. Howard, M.A., conducting the last sad rites. Mr. Chandler was the undertaker.
Source: Windsor and Richmond Gazett 19 Oct 1934


17. John Smallwood

Mr. John Smallwood, a descendant of one of the first settlers in the Commonwealth and a prominent Hawkesbury farmer, died at his residence at Pitt Town recently, Mr. Smallwood, who was born in the Hawkesbury district 81 years ago, was a son of the late James Smallwood, and a grandson of the late John Hobbs, who secured a grant of land at Pitt Town in 1793. He was also one of the claimants to the Hobbs millions, a claim for which is now being prepared.
Mr. John Smallwood took a keen interest in public affairs, and was for many years closely associated with the Hawkesbury Agricultural Society, was warden of the Pitt Town Church of England, and, some years ago, was a worker for the Windsor District Hospital.
A son and two daughters survive. The interment took place In the Church of Englnnd Cemetery, Pitt Town, the Rev. S. Howard, M.A., performing the last rites.
Source: The SMH 30 Jul 1928

PITT TOWN OCTOGENARIAN
THE LATE JOHN SMALLWOOD
ONE of the finest men in the Hawkesbury district has been 'gathered to his fathers' in the person of Mr.-John Smallwood, who, after a short illness, breathed his last on Monday at his home at Pitt Town. He had reached the great age of 81 vears.  The late John Smallwood was a man who was liked and respected right throughout the Hawkesbury district. He possessed a wonderfully kind disposition ,and was a good and upright man. There was no more industrious farmer in the district, and by his industry and thrift he made a success of life. Indeed, until within a few weeks of his death it ,was a remarkable fact that he was able to do a day's hard work behind a plough, and he would shame many farmers of the younger generation. He was a great horseman, and practically, died in the saddle. Even at his great age he used to ride to Windsor, though his trips, were'not so numerous in recent years. To his church he was conspicuously faithful and devoted, and was a regular atten dant in his place in God's Home until he was .laid aside a week or so before his demise. Good John Smallwood was a Christian gentleman in the true sense of the term, and he will be missed my many. Let it be said that his life was an example for all — he being a man of sterling character, and one whose word was his bond. His kindness and. hearty welcome will' be long remembered by those who had the pleasure of visiting his home. Born at. Pitt Town he was a son of the late James and Sarah Smallwood. He lived in the district all his life, and at the age of 21 years was married to Celia Cavanagh, a member of another well-known Hawkesbury family at the time. They reared a family of five children, two of whom predeceased their father. Those living are: Sarah, George and Vienna. The remains were laid to rest in the Church of England cemetery at Pitt Town the day following his demise. The funeral was a large one, a further proof of the great respect in which John Smallwood was held. Rev.- S. Howard, M.A., carried out the last solemn rites, and Mr. Chandler was the undertaker.
Source: Windsor and Richmond Gazette 27 Jul 1928

AN APPRECIATION
THE LATE JOHN SMALLWOOD (To the Editor)
Sir, — Owing to the effects of influenza I am precluded from paying my respect by personal attendance at the,funeral of the late John Smallwood tomorrow. I do feel, however, that I must write and bear testimony to the real worth of one of the Hawkesbury's most interesting identities. , As a young man, in fact all through life, he was a veritable Boanerges (Son of Thunder), yet at the same time possessed a gentility of character rarely seen in. a man of the countryside: For many ']years he faithfully represented the Church, of England as Rector's Warden at Pitt, Town, and was known far and wide by the churchfolk. At the Diocesan Festivals at Sydney year by year lhe had the privilege of exhibiting a unique display of maize, a range of no less than 9 varieties and colors. Successive Archbishops always heartily welcomed him. He was the guest of the 'rich', and the friend of the poor — a man of high Christian principle, a worthy son of the church, and an estimable citizen. It was said of old 'Can any good come out of' Nazareth?' And one might appropriately say of 'Old John,' 'Can any good come out of Pitt Town?' Outwardly he was as'hard and rough as a piece of cast iron; inwardly he always appeared as the gentleman and the man. 'The Souls of the righteous are in the Hand of God, and there shall no torment touch them.' Yours sincerely, — G, P. BIRK. St. Peter's Rectory- Mortdale. ( July 23, 1928.
Source: Windsor and Richmond Gazette 27 Jul 1928


20. Joseph Smallwood

BODY IN LAGOON
FATALITY AT LONGNECK DEATH OF JOSEPH SMALLWOOD
MISSING from his home at Pitt Town for nearly two days, the body of the late Joseph Smallwood, a well-known farmer, in that locality, was recovered from the waters of Longneck Lagoon shortly after noon on Saturday. The previous Thursday afternoon the deceased went down to Longneck pit on horseback in search of his cows, which graze in the vicinity of the lagoon.  Though no one actually witnessed what eventually transpired, it is surmised that he rode into the lagoon after a stray cow or two and got out of his depth and was drowned. When the mare he was riding was discovered near the water's edge later that night, its hind quarters were wet and the saddle saturated. The late Joseph (Smallwood was 71 years of age, and was born at Pitt Town where he lived all his life. He was highly respected and beloved by all who knew him, and there were many sincere expressions of regret when his death and the unfortunate circumstances surrounding it became known, he was in good health and in the best of spirits on the day of the sad event. Forty-eight years ago he was married at Windsor to Susannah Riley, who survives him, together with a family of four sons and five daughters, viz., James (Homebush), Joseph (Lidcornbe), Lillian (Mrs. Brown Melbourne), Alice (Mrs. Hurren, Glebe), George (Tamworth), Mary (Mrs. Sinclair (Dee Why), Annie (Mrs. Thompson, Cattai), Vioiet (Mrs. Rose (Abbotsford), and Andrew Mark (Pitt Town). One son pre deceased his father. The funeral took place on Sunday, the remains being laid to rest in the Pitt Town Church of England cemetery. Rev. Stanley Howard, M.A., conducted the last sad rites, and Mr. Chandler was the undertaker.

CORONER'S INQUIRY An inquiry into the circumstances surrounding the death of the late Joseph Small wood was conducted by the District Coroner (Mr. H. S. Johnston, J.P.) at the Court. House, Windsor, on Wednesday. Sergeant C. A.Morgan attended to assist the Coroner. Constable Hitchcock was the first witness, he stated that from information received he proceeded to Longneck Lagoon, near Pitt Town, on Friday last and again on Saturday, to assist in the search for the body of the late Joseph Smallwood, who had been reported missing. He continued the seach until 1 p.m. on Saturday, whe he re turned to Windsor for lunch, intending to revisit the scene in the afternoon. During his, temporary absence he received a telephone message to the effect that the body had been found in the water at Longneck. He proceeded to the spot in, company with the Coroner and Dr. Arnold, and saw the body at the water's edge. Deceased had a strap hitched around his left hand, which he apparently used as a riding whip. At the spot the body was found the water deepened suddenly from the bank from five to nine feet. From police inquiries made, there did not appear to be any suspicious circumstances surrounding tire tragedy. . John Grono, a farmer, of Pitt Town, said he had known the deceased for upwards of' 45 years. He was informed on Friday last that Mr. Smallwood was missing from his home, and with others assisted in a search of Longneck Lagoon. He was in a boat with grappling irons when he recovered the body in about nine feet of water shortly after noon on Saturday. Andrew Mark Smallwood, farmer of Pitt Town, said he was a son of the deceased. He last saw his father alive at 7 a.m. - on. Thursday. He was then well and apparently in good health and spirits. 'I was away during the day, proceeded witness, 'and when I returned home about 6 o'clock my father was not there.- Mother told me that he left home on horseback at 4.30 p.m. to go for the cows, which were grazing at Longneck. When he did not return within a reasonable time I became alarmed and went to look for him. About 10 o'clock that night I discovered his horse at Longneck, about 50 yards -from where the body was subsequently found. The horse still had the saddle and bridle on, the saddle tteing- saturated with water. The hind quarters of the mare were also wet. Next day I identified the body after it had. been taken from the lagoon.' Witness said the lagoon was infested with weeds and logs, and, in his opinion, if a man got into deep water it would be difficult for him to get out. The horse his father rode was. quiet, and the strap found around the deceased's hand was used as a whip. On former occasions, added witness, the deceased had gone into the lagoon on horseback to drive the cows out. At this stage it was announced that there was only one more witness, the Government Medical Officer (Dr. Arnold), who was away on urgent business in the city. The inquiry was thereupon adjourned un til this Friday, September 1, at 11 a.m.
Source: Windsor and Richmond Gazette 7 Sep 1928


Susannah Riley

MRS. SUSANNAH SMALLWOOD
The death took place at her residence, Pitt Town, on Friday last, November 13, of Mrs. Susannah Smallwood, relict of the late Joseph Smallwood, at the ripe age of 81 years. She was a daughter of the late Edward Riley, of Webb's Creek, and was married at Windsor at the age of 23 years to Joseph SmallAvood, who predeceased her in 1928. She had lived at Pitt Town all her life, and was respected and esteemed by a wide circle of friends. Four sons and five daughters survive their mother, viz., James (Mayor of Homebush), Joseph (Lidcombe), Lily (Mrs. Browne, Melbourne), Alice (Mrs. Hurren, Summer Hill), Violet (Mrs. Rose, Abbotsford), Mary (Mrs. St. Clair, Willoughby), Annie (Mrs. Thompson, Cattai), George (Police Constable, Tamworth), and Mark (Pitt Town) . Miss Bridget Riley (Sydney), Mrs. Julia Goddard (Waverley) Mrs. Lizzie Miller (Sydney) are sisters, and Mr. William Riley (Canberra) is a brother of the deceased. The funeral took place on Saturday afternoon, the remains being interred in the Church of England cemetery, Pitt Town. Ald. Knight, Mason, Clifford, Herick and Conlon, Mr. H. Kerruish (Town Clerk) and Mr. G. Bressington (overseer) represented the Homebush Council at the funeral. Rev. S. Howard, M.A., conducted the service at the graveside and Mr. Chandler was the undertaker.
Source: Windsor and Richmond Gazette 20 Nov 1936


Daniel James Smallwood

OBITUARY.

The death of Mr. Daniel James Smallwood, a very old and respected resident of Caddai Greek, took place at his residence recently, at the advanced age of 78 years. The deceased had resided at Caddai all his life, and was well known throughout the Hawkesbury. He leaves a wife and family of grown-up sons and daughters, who are scattered over the State. The funeral took place on Monday and was largely attended. The remains were conveyed to Ebenezer Presbyterian Cemetery by boat and the long string of boats that followed formed quite an imposing sight. At the church the hymn " Rock of Ages" was sung, and a very impressive address was delivered by the Rev. A. Dandie, who officiated at the grave. The remains were placed in a leaden coffin, the outside casket being of handsomely polished cedar. The funeral arrangements were carried out by Mr. Thomas Primrose.
Source: Windsor and Richmond Gazette 2 Feb 1901