Australian English Genealogy

 Descendants of John Frederick Cobcroft

Notes - Page 11



630. Eva Ruth Dunstan

Marriage registered as Dunston


 


158. Richard William Cobcroft

1892
Eight Hours Granted.
About a week ago two delegates-Messrs. Carroll and White from the Tanners and Curriers' Union, Sydney, waited on Mr. R. V. Cobcroft, and made a request that the eight hours system should be adopted in the establishment, Mr. Cobcroft requested to be allowed to consider the matter, and on Thursday agreed to concede the request. The men employed by Mr. Cobcroft will, therefore, from Monday next, enjoy the boon of eight hours, without the slightest reduction in their present rate of wages. Mr. Cobcroft is to be complimented on this decision, and the local branch of the Union is deserving of praise for having been instrumental in securing the end they had in view without causing any friction. The other local establishments have not yet agitated in the direction of securing any reduction in the number of hours worked,  but in view of the success which has met | the efforts of their brethren, there is no doubt they will do so.
Source: Windsor and Richmond Gazette 20 Feb 1892

___________________________________________________________________

DEATH OF MR. R. W. COBCROFT.
WINDSOR, Saturday.— Mr. R. W. Coticroft, J.P., after an illness of long duration, died at his; residence, Glenroy, Newtown, last night. He was a central figure in the community, and prominent in all movements for the good o'f the district. He was a large employer of labor, being proprietor of the Newtown tannery, and was well known commercially on the Colonial and Home market. Politically, Mr. Cobcroft's opinion and influence were eagerly sought after by candidates at election time, and socially he was a leader. His death will be a great loss to the district. He was only 46 years of age.

Source: Evening News 6 Aug 1900

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Mr. Richard William Cobcroft, J. P.
WHOSE photo we reproduce herewith was born in Wilberforce in the year
1854. He received his education at a denominational school at that town, a Mr. Finder being the principal. After 7 years schooling at this institution he entered into the tanning business. In the year 1872 he hied to Sydney, and entered into the employ- ment of Mr. T. J. Dunn, of the Glibe, with whom he remained for a period of 14 years, nine years of which he held the position of manager. In 1886 he again returned to Windsor, and started in the tanning business on his own account at Newtown, where by capable management and no small amount of thrift. he has worked up a large and lucrative business - probably one of the most solid in the district. Mr. Cobcroft is also one of the largest shareholders of the famous Cleveland Bicycle Company, of the Equitable Building, Sydney. He is one of our citizens who work hard in thc interest of our historic town and district, and at no time begrudges as- sistance in a worthy cause. Naturally he is highly respected, and his suc-
MR. RICHARD Wm. COBCROFT.
cessful life should prove a worthy ob-
ject lesson to other Hawkesbury natives. He is an out and out Protectionist, and has proved an influential and strong supporter of Mr. Brinsley Hill, whose photo also appears on this page. He was made a Justice of the Peace in 1892. Mr. Cob- croft was married in the year 1880 to Miss Gertrude Russell, of the Royal Hotel, Windsor, and has a family of six children. He is also largely interested with others, in this paper, a boast whieh the management have pleasure in making.
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OBITUARY.
Death of Mr. Richard William
Cobcroft, J. P.
It is with sincere grief we an
nounce the death of Mr. Richard William Cobcroft, J.P., who died at his residence, "Glenroy," on the 3rd of August, after a lingering illness. For some months the de ceased gentleman had been com plaining of ill-health, but nothing serious was contemplated by his family or friends. The late Mr Cobcroft endeared himself to all with whom he came in con tact ; he was a sincere friend, a charitable man, and, when his health permitted, a keen sportsman. His numerous acts of quiet charity will be a memory with us for many years, and the support which the deceased gentleman has always given to all matters relating to local sport will be missed by all. It was gratifying to note the large and representative funeral, includ ing many prominent Sydney people, which followed the body to the grave. All sections of the com munity were there, the rich and
The Late Mr, R. W. Cobcroft.
the poor, the high and the lowly, all actuated by the same worthy ob ject of paying respect to the de ceased, who was buried on the 4th of August. The coffin, which was a very handsome one of cedar, be ing silver mounted, was made by Mr. T. Collison, of Windsor, who also carried out the funeral arrange ments very well. Numbers of beautiful wreaths were placed on the grave, a great many of them having been sent from Sydney. The body was carriod from the house of the deceased gentleman to the hearse by four of his employees. The funeral left the residence of the deceased at four o'clock, and wended its way to St. Matthew's Church, a body of Freemasons walking in front of the hearse in the Society's regalia The pall bearers were Messrs. Morgan, M.P., Brinsley Hall, Norman Hall, and Mr. Prosper Ridge, (of Rich- mond). The body was carried from the hearse into the church by the deceased gentleman's five brothers, and Mr. H. Beecroft. The burial service, conducted by the Rev S. G. Fielding, was impressive, and
some hymns were sung. After the Rev. Mr. Fielding had read the Church of England service at the grave side, Mr. J.J. Paine did a similar duty on behalf of the Masonic body.
who sent wreaths and floral offer ings :-George . Wilcox & Co, Hr. and Mrs. H. Pateson, Mr. G. Pitt and family, (Sunnyside), the employees of Messrs. John Henty £ Son, Messrs. Fred Aldereon & Co., Mir. and Mrs! Carroll, Miss. Myra Linsley, employees of Fresh Food and Ice Co., Sydney Cycle Co., Mr. and Mrs. Ward, Mr. and Mrs. Flexman, Mr. and Mrs. Brinsley Hall, Mr. and Mrs. John Hunter and family, Mr. and Mrs. Lobb, Mr. W. Benson, Mr. H. Cobcroft, Mr. and Mrs. Bloome, Members of Cleveland Bicycle Club, Mr. and Mrs. G. Kirwan, Mr, and Mrs. Padley, Mrs. Barnett and family, Mr. and Mrs. G. * Davis, John Hunter & Sons' Factory hands, Mr. Alick Hunter, tannery emploj'ees.
The late Richard William Cob croft, J.P, was born at Wilber- force in the year 1854, and re- ceived his education in a private
those
school. After seven years school ing, in which he showed much
ability, he entered the tanning business in Windsor. In 1872 he received an appointment at Mr. T. J. Dunn's tannery at the Glebe, I where he worked steadily and re
ceived prom >tion, he being, during the latter nine years of his stay, I manager for Mr. Dunn. In 1886
I Mr. Cobcroft returned to Windsor,
and started a tannery, which he worked well and profitably up to the time of his death. Mr. Cob
croft was very popular among bis I men, and will be very much missed. The deceased gentleman was one of ' the largest shareholders in the Cleveland Bicycle Company. He I was also a strong and consistent I protectionist, an i his a i vice has
been much valued during political campaigns of the past. The deceased gentleman was made a Justice of the Peace ia 1892. and was mar ried in 1880, there being six chil dren as issue. The family of the late Mr. Cobcroft have with them
I the heartfelt sympathy of the whole
district in this their time of afflic I tiou.
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Mr. Richard William Cob-
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croft, J. P.
WHOSE photo we reproduce herewith was born in Wilberforce in the year
1854. He received his education at a denominational school at that town, a Mr. finder being the principal. After 7 years schooling at this insti- tution he entered into the tanning business. In the year 1872 he hied to Sydney, and entered into the employ- ment of Mr. T. J. Dunn, of the Glibe, with whom he remained for a period of 14 years, nine years of which he held the position of manager. In 1886 he again returned to Windsor, and started in the tanning business on his own account at Newtown, where by capable management and no small amount of thrift. he has worked up a large and lucrative business - pro bably one of the most solid in the district. Mr. Cobcroft is also one of the largest shareholders of the famous Cleveland Bicycle Company, of the Equitable Building, Sydney. He is one of our citizens who work hard in thc interest of our historic town and district, and at no time begrudges as- sistance in a worthy cause. Naturally he is highly respected, and his suc-
MR. RICHARD Wm. COBCROFT.
cessful life should prove a worthy ob-
ject lesson to other Hawkesbury natives. He is an out and out Protectionist, and has proved an influential and strong supporter of Mr. Brinsley Hill, whose photo also appears on this page. He was made a Justice of the Peace in 1892. Mr. Cob- croft was married in the year 1880 to Miss Gertrude Russell, of the Royal Hotel, Windsor, and has a family of six children. He is also largely interested with others, in this paper, a boast whieh the management have pleasure in making.
Source: Hawkesbury Advocate 22 Dec 1899


160. John Frederick Cobcroft

'COBBY'
ALD. J. F. COBCROFT, OF WINDSOR
(By 'WILBERFORCE')
For upwards of 60 years— as boy, man and elderly man— I . have known J. F. Cotocroft, alderman of Windsor; and at each of the six homes, Wilberforce, 'Brandon,' Glebe Point, 'Abbotsford,' and 'Brainstock,' King's Cross, and 'Clifton Cottage,' Windsor, he and his good wife have occupied, I have always received hospitality of the good old-fashioned sort that left no room for doubt as to its sincerity. It was as 'Jack Cobby' we kids of Wilberforce of over half a century ago knew the present alderman of Windsor, and the chances are that any casual visitor to the village encountering a group of more or lessIbarefooted youngsters on their way to or from school and asking where 'Mr. Cofbroft' lived would have been met with an almost incredulous stare, -whereas the same inquiry applied to 'Jack Cobby' would have met with instantaneous response, with meticulous details as to whether he was exercising a racehorse at the Little 'Swamp or Over at the 'Oaks' at Pitt Town, breaking in a young horse for Peter de Rome, or maybe working- on his own farm. The answers relative to horses would be the most likely to be correct, for 'Cobby' was a born horseman, and in all my recollections of him in a long association his nearest approach to a laugh in my experience was when he was showing superb mastery over an outlaw at the back of the old (Retreat Hotel Wilberforce , where he was born, and where '('I have been told by men much older than myself) he could ride nearly as soon as he could walk. 'Cobby' in my boyhood days always rode an outstandingly good horse. It might not always be his own. Many owners of anything out of the equine common were onlv too glad to let the intrepid young horseman take the animal in hand and 'make a proper hack' of him. 'Cobby' in his younger days was alsoia capable race as well as buckjump rider, and won many races in the district as far away as Wiseman's Ferry, St. Albans, Kurrajong and other distant parts. They were distant then because motor cars were unknown, and the horses taking part in the various races referred to had to be walked to the courses — not conveyed in luxurious floats (motor) as in present times.
In 1881 John F. Cobcroft and Ada Robinson (the eldest of six pretty daughters of the late Alfred and Mary Ann Robinson and the acknowledged belle of the district) were united in wedlock by the Rev. Garnsey (the clergyman who had christened Ada Robinson) at Christ Church, Sydney, and the young couple resided for a short time at Forest Lodge. It was only a matter of a few weeks when a position was found for 'Mr. Cobcroft in charge of the transport and delivery section of the Fresh Food and Ice Co. Ltd. There were no motors in those days, so naturally a good man with horses was just what was wanted, and notwithstanding the fact that the general manager was J.F.C.'s. brother ttn-law, no 'better man could be found for, the work in the Commonwealth. He remained in the employ of that company for nearer 50 than 40 years, and it is a safe bet that, he had every department of that great metpolitan food company been managed with .the same efficiency as Mr. Cobcroft's the results all round would have been much be ter for its many influential shareholders. Later on J.F.C. was appointed inspector of dairies for the company, and paid many visits to the district. Many old-time dairy men remember that he always turned the blind eye to trifling- faults that the Government inspectors of today would magnify out of all proportion. And by a strange coincidence they all appeared to to be forewarned of his inquisitorial visits a few days before hand, giving them time in many cases to do a general clean-up — for they all knew 'Cobby' and respected him so much that the best they could do to please him was always willingly done. But city life for Mrs. Cobcroft was not to be endured, and it was not long before she took over 'Abbotsford,' one of the largest and most fashionable boarding establishments in the now famous King's Cross area — the brightlights of Sydney. 'Abbotsford' was run on homely, but superior lines, and attracted high -class customers, many of whom made it their home for years. I much doutot whether its superior could be found in that far-famed locality to-day. I speak with authority, for I am enrolled for. the electorate which embraces King's Cross, but not the fashionable section which once em braced 'Abbotsford,' the site of which to-dlay is covered with palatial business premises, and the locality is easily the brightest and most colorful of all Sydney. But let's get back to 'Cobby' and his horses! It was not long before the milk cart horses of the F.F. and I. Co. were 'being talked about, such notice did they attract in the city, and it was only a step before some of them were being shown successfully at the Royal Show — and that, above all others I know, is the place where champions may be looked for. Not satisfied with win ing in business turnout classes, 'Cobby' dug up a big brown colt somewhere in the 'Oxbra' with 'which-he won the buggy horse championship five times at the 'Sydney Royal. Then he grumbled because it took him six years to do it. And this shows the superb equine artistry of the man which entitled him to the designation of ''a .born horseman.' He knew when his horse was not fit to be shown, and wisely kept him in the stall rather than risk defeat. Some of your old-time readers may rememtoer the horse — he was ' Sir Benjamin, which travelled the Hawkestoury district. I often enjoyed a ride behind Prince, but seldom at more than a walk oir a slow jcg, ibetween the Glebe and the F.(F. and I. Co's. works in Harbour-street, near the Trades Hall. This was .part of Prince's edu cation daily for many weeks prioir to the Royal Show in which he so successfully competed. , . Then there was another grand little show performer, 'Pippo,' taken out of one of the company's carts at a big .price toy Haiiry Morton, who in his day controlled the lar gest string of show jumpers in N.iS.W., and probatoly in the Commonwealth. But even Harry Morton did not know this — that young Rowley' Cotocroft, who dutifully visits his parents every week-end, had been for a time secretly training; 'Pippo' on the re claimed sand flats near Ttozelle Bay, and was on the point of having the horse saddled up for a hurdle race at old Lillitoridge (now Epping) racecourse, when father came along, ordered the scratching of the horse, and marched it 'back to the stables where it belonged, and from which it was subsequent ly purchased toy Harry Morton and .became I a show jumper of considerable renown. I j got the story first-hand from dear old dead I and gone .Artie Bowman many years ago. But 'Cobby's' crowning effort with horses — or rather a horse — came in 1913. Mr. James Chambers, a 'well-known northern sportsman, had a horse called Posinatus engaged in j the Melbourne Cup at a light weight. Mr. Chambers disliked hotels and always made 'Atobotsford' his home at his not- infrequent visits to the city. Just before the Melbourne Cup of 1913 a .plague scare toroke out and it was ordained that any man travelling to Melbourne must be inoculated. Stubborn old Jim swore he would scratch the horse rather than submit to inoculation. A few sporting; friends met the veteran trainer and discussed the matter with him at 'A'bbotsford .' 'Cototoy,' even as Alderman. Cobcroft, -was never renowned as a talkative man; 'but on this occasion, after hearing the views of all' t
the others and Mr. Chambers' firm refusal to budge from the position he had taken up, chipped in 'Why, d ? it all I'll take the horse over myself — and win with him, too!' It was half joke, half earnest, but it all came true, and is included in the annals of the turf for all time. By his fireside at Clif ton Cottage 'Cotoby' (Alderman Cotocroft now) has told me the story first-hand more than once, and it never varied: 'I fed' the horse on the good old Red Hogan' (a particular brand of maize then .popular — may toe now for aught I know) 'and that's what igave him the stamina to run out the two miles and toest part of the -last mile in front,' the veteran concluded. 'Of course,', he added, 'some smart Alick newchums had their laugh at the old man — I was no chic ken then— 'but I had the laugh at the right end.' ? It was characteristic of .Mr. Cobcroft that after Avinning the Melbourne Cup Avith Po sinatus he packed up and 'brought the horse straight home — and the Cup and the good fat -cheque' which . accompanied it too. Xoav Alderman Cobcroft, when Avell enough, jogs taround with his old pony 'Mogo,' and it is safe to say that the appearance of the chairman of the works committee carries no fear to the Avorkmen, Avith whom he is eArer ready to engage in friendly conA?erse while they straighten their backs for a 'smoko' with J.F.C. and 'Mogo.'

Source: Windsor and Richmond Gazette 11 Aug 1939


162. Henry Cobcroft

THE WILBERFORCE TRAGEDY.
MRS. COBCROFT ACQUITTED.
At the Central Criminal Court to-day Margaret Cobcroft pleaded not guilty to a charge of having on March 3, at Wilber- force, near Windsor, murdered Henry Cob-
croft, her husband.
The case for the Crown showed that a quarrel occurred between the accused and her husband at an hotel which they kept at Wilberforce. During the quarrel Cob- croft received a stab from a carving-knife held by Mrs. Cobcroft. The two had been married about three years, and it was stated that Cobcroft had frequently ill-treated his
wife.
Mrs. Cobcroft swore that the deceased used bad language to her, and struck her on the face with his fist. He also caught her by the throat while holding the carving- knife in his hand. She was nursing a baby, and took the knife out of her hus- band s hand while he was backing against her to prevent her from getting out of the room. In the struggle between them the knife entered her husband's body, without her knowing it. The jury acquitted the ac- cused, and she was discharged

mARTH C901
THE WILBERFORCE TRAGEDY.
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MRS. COBCROFT COMMITTED FOR
TRIAL.
SYDNEY, Tuesday.
An inquest was held to-day at Windsor concerning the death of Henry Cobcroft, licensee of the Hawkesbury Hotel, Wilber- force, who was stabbed on Sunday morn- ing, and died four hours afterwards. The evidence showed that Cobcroft was killing a fowl, and had a carving knife in his hand. He and his wife were meanwhile quar- relling, when by some means she obtained possession of the knife, and during a scuffle Cobcroft was wounded in the back with the knife. The medical evidence showed that it penetrated for 4in. The evidence of other witnesses was to the
effect that wrangling between the pair was frequent. The jury brought in a verdict of manslaughter against Margaret Cob- croft, with a recommendation to mercy, as the act was committed under great provo- cation. Bail was allowed, accused in £150 and one surety of a like amount

Sydney, April 3. CHARGE OF MURDER.
On Tuesday Margaret Cobcroft was tried for the murder of her husband, Henry Cobcroft, at Wilberforce, on March 3. A verdict of not


THE WILBERFORCE TRAGEDY.
MRS. COBCROFT ACQUITTED.
At the Central Criminal Court to-day Margaret Cobcroft pleaded not guilty to a charge of having on March 3, at Wilber- force, near Windsor, murdered Henry Cob-
croft, her husband.
The case for the Crown showed that a quarrel occurred between the accused and her husband at an hotel which they kept at Wilberforce. During the quarrel Cob- croft received a stab from a carving-knife held by Mrs. Cobcroft. The two had been married about three years, and it was stated that Cobcroft had frequently ill-treated his
wife.
Mrs. Cobcroft swore that the deceased used bad language to her, and struck her on the face with his fist. He also caught her by the throat while holding the carving- knife in his hand. She was nursing a baby, and took the knife out of her hus- band s hand while he was backing against her to prevent her from getting out of the room. In the struggle between them the knife entered her husband's body, without her knowing it. The jury acquitted the ac- cused, and she was discharged

mARTH C901
THE WILBERFORCE TRAGEDY.
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MRS. COBCROFT COMMITTED FOR
TRIAL.
SYDNEY, Tuesday.
An inquest was held to-day at Windsor concerning the death of Henry Cobcroft, licensee of the Hawkesbury Hotel, Wilber- force, who was stabbed on Sunday morn- ing, and died four hours afterwards. The evidence showed that Cobcroft was killing a fowl, and had a carving knife in his hand. He and his wife were meanwhile quar- relling, when by some means she obtained possession of the knife, and during a scuffle Cobcroft was wounded in the back with the knife. The medical evidence showed that it penetrated for 4in. The evidence of other witnesses was to the
effect that wrangling between the pair was frequent. The jury brought in a verdict of manslaughter against Margaret Cob- croft, with a recommendation to mercy, as the act was committed under great provo- cation. Bail was allowed, accused in £150 and one surety of a like amount

Sydney, April 3. CHARGE OF MURDER.
On Tuesday Margaret Cobcroft was tried for the murder of her husband, Henry Cobcroft, at Wilberforce, on March 3. A verdict of not

Known as William. Licensee of the Old Retreat Hotel

Wages Case.
Fannie Voysey proceeded against William Cob croft Junder the Masters' and Servants' Act fora debt of £4. 5s alleged to be owing to her daughter for work done as a general servant, k Mr J J Paine appeared for plaintiff, Mr R B Walker for defendant, Fannie Voyseyt residing at Marsden Park, de posed- that she was the mother of Mary Voysey, on^wbose behalf she laid the complaint; took her
daughter to Cobcroft's at Wilberforce on 27th January ; the arrangement was that her daughter should receive 5s per week, and witness afterwards arranged for the 5s to be laid out in clothes ; Mrs Cobcroft never paid the girl anything in money; only provided one dress and two pairs of shoes ; this amounted to about three weeks' wages in all ; the amount sued for was from February 15 to June 19, a period of 17 weeks ; on June 12 witness went to Mrs Cobcroft's; took her daughter away on that day in consequence of the disgusting lan guage used there; saw Mrs Cobcroft again on Jutie 25; Mrs Cobcroft promised to send the. clothes on, but they did not come ; witness' hus band wrote for the girl's ?; clothes and they were then sent on by train; witness' husband sent a second letter on July 16; never received any of thai clothes Mrs Cobcroft was to buy for her, only those- witness gave her daughter; the girl was getting 7s per week now at Petersham. To Mr Walker : Did not make an arrangement with Mrs Joseph at Riverstone about sending the girl to Wilberforce; Mrs Joseph did not agree with witness to send the girl up to Cobcroft's; it was not a fact that when witness' daughter was at Wilberforce she was one of the best dressed girls there ; her daughter was never at service prior to going to Cobcroft's ; was not a fact that Mr Cob croft bad to dismiss her daughter; it was not a ' fact.that her daughter wrote witness a disgustiag letter. Mary Voysey deposed that she went into the service of Mr Cobcroft, at Wilberforce, on January 27 ; was employed as domestic ; heF wages were to be 5/- per week ; never received any money from Mr or Mrs Cobcroft ; received a dress and two pairs of shoes ; carried out her duties properly ; her mother went to Cobcroft's and took her away ;i t was not a fact Mr Cobcroft discharged her ; Cob croft never made any complaints about her; Mrs Cobcroft since wanted witness to go back. To Mr Walker: Was not present with her mother when she arranged with Mrs Cobcroft about going to service ; was always well dressed in her own clothes ; had no clothes that Mrs Cob croft bought ; Mrs Cobcroft never gave witness any pocket money ; never asked Mrs Cobcroft for any wages at any time ; remembered writing one letter to her mother ; had no pictures in it. , For the defence, Margaret Cobcroft deposed. that' she was the wife of William Cobcroft ; did not know complainant was coming into her service until 'she heard from Riverstone ; nothing was said about wages; witness was to provide her clothes and keep her ; complainant could not do anything when she went into witness' employ ; looked after her well ; always gave her plenty of. clothes, and she was treated as one of themselves ; witness offered complainant 2/6 per week to come back ; often gave her pocket money, and on one occasion &ave her 7/6 ; complainant's statements were false; found a letter in complainant's room, which . witness showed her husband; opened another letter written by complainant containing some nasty things about witness; dismissed the cotnpla'inant on account of this. To- Mr Paine: When witness offered to take complainant back she wao to be paid wages ; the letter witness opened was not sealed ; had given complainant numerous blouses, skirts, and under clothes ; could not say whether the value of the clothes would be as much as the amount claimed ; there was no conversation with witness when Mrs Voysey brought the girl to witness' house; it was an understood thing between them that the com plainant wao only to receive clothes ; did not think complainant was worth 7/ per week. William Cobcroft deposed that he did not bear the arrangement made about the complainant; she never: aBked. for wages ; complainant was always dressed as well as Mrs Cobcroft ; the first witness heard: of the 5/- per week business was a. week after complainant was dismissed ; the whole arrangement was left in Mrs Cobcroft's hands To Mr Paine : I cannot mention a single article that Mrs Cobcroft bought for complainant ; re membered complainant having a new dress to go to Eiver6tone to a ball ; witness dismissed the com-, plainant, To Mr Walker : Employed a lot of labor ; never had any trouble before ; was testing this case be oause he was not indebted, In answer to the Bench complainant admitted that she received some money from Mrs Cobcroft. Mr Walker and Mr Paine addressed the Bench' at considerable length on behalf of 'their clients, after which the Bench considered the case and _ decided to dismiss it without costs.
Source: Windsor and Richmond Gazette 1 Sep 1900


Margaret A Joseph

THE WILBERFORCE TRAGEDY.
MRS. COBCROFT ACQUITTED.
At the Central Criminal Court to-day Margaret Cobcroft pleaded not guilty to a charge of having on March 3, at Wilber- force, near Windsor, murdered Henry Cob-
croft, her husband.
The case for the Crown showed that a quarrel occurred between the accused and her husband at an hotel which they kept at Wilberforce. During the quarrel Cobcroft received a stab from a carving-knife held by Mrs. Cobcroft. The two had been married about three years, and it was stated that Cobcroft had frequently ill-treated his wife.
Mrs. Cobcroft swore that the deceased used bad language to her, and struck her on the face with his fist. He also caught her by the throat while holding the carving- knife in his hand. She was nursing a baby, and took the knife out of her hus- band's hand while he was backing against her to prevent her from getting out of the room. In the struggle between them the knife entered her husband's body, without her knowing it. The jury acquitted the ac- cused, and she was discharged.
Source: The Argus (Melbourne) 3 Apr 1901

Margaret's death was recorded as Margaret Joseph.


163. Arthur Cobcroft

Divoced 1901

1894
Windsor Police Court
At the Windsor Police Court to-day (Friday) before the P.M., Dr Callaghan, and Mr B Hall, J.P., Arthur Cobcroft wascharged with illtreating a horse on. the 20th inst, by driving it with sore shoulders.


1894
Windsor Police Court.
At the Windsor Police Court on Friday. Ellen Elizabeth Kiley proceeded against Arthur Cobcroft for having attempted to indecently assault her at Wilberforce on the 6th instant. Mr. Morgan appeared for the defendant. The Plaintiff (who was not represented), deposed that defendant attempted to commit the offence at Mrs Gordon's with whom she lived ¡ she screamed for Mrs ; Gordon- (Case proceeding), v !


1901
The police at Windsor on Thursday last made a raid on the Commercial Hotel in that town, and found two illicit stills in working order. At the local police court to-day Arthur Cobcroft, the licensee of the hotel, was fined £100, or 12 months' imprisonment.

The Cattle-Killing Case.
CHARGE OP CONSPIRACY.
At the Windsor Police Court on Tuesday, before Messrs Primrose, Conion, B. Hall, and P. Butler,
Robert Rogers (Constable) and Arthur Cobcroft, were proceeded against by Percy Orlando Reynolds, for that they did in the month of August conspire to falsely accuse Percy Orlando Reynolds, David Hayes, and Henry Shepherd, of having killed certain cattle.


Mr. Kiley (on behalf of Mr. Crick) for the prosecution, Mr. Baker and Mr. C. Bull for the accused.
Mr. Bull asked that witnesses be not allowed to prowl about the door of the Court. He also asked that Reynolds, being prosecutor, should be called first, explaining that Mr. Kiley's object evidently was to have Reynolds by to hear the evidence, and then put him into the box later on. If Reynolds were not put into the box first he would ask that he be sent outside with the rest of the witnesses.
Mr; Kiley said Mr. Bull was acting on the assumption that he was going to put Reynolds into the box, but this be did not think necessary. He had the right to con duct the prosecution in Lis own way, with out bounce or bully.
Mr. Bnll said nothing was intended by him to take the character of bounce or
bully. The case was an extraordinary one in all partieulars. It appeared that Rey nolds was one of three persons convicted some time ago, and it was natural to assume that he would be called as a witness.
The Chairman said the practice had been that the person laying the information should go into the box first and prove his information. If this were not done Rey nolds would have to leave the Court, un less Mr. Kiley would give his promise that
he would not be a witness.
Mr. Kiley said he would not put Reynolds
into the box at all.
David Duncomb, laborer, knew defen dants; saw them 14 months before at his place on a Sunday; both Cobby and Rogers were there, and his missus, Sarah Hand ; Cobcroft called him and his missus out, and Rogers then came up; Cobcroft said, "You must know something about these cattle; I want you to prosecute Perc. Reynolds, Hayes, and Shepherd-I want you to commit them; I'll give you £10," and then he turned tp Rogers and said, " You won't be particular to a pound or two," and Rogers replied, "No"; witness said " We'll have nothing to do with it" ; Rogers said they need never go short of tea, flour, or sugar, as they could send to his place for what they wanted; Cobcroft promised to supply them with what meat they wanted; witness said " all right" : witness gave evidence against Reynolds,
Shepherd, and Hayes at the Police Court; j [Mr. Kiley here sought to put in the depo sitions of Duncomb, but Messrs Bull and Baker objected] ; that evidence given by him was false; Constable Rogers, one of the defendants, brought him to the Police Court; he afterwards gave evidence at the Quarter Sessions; between the committal and the holding of the Quarter Sessions, Rogers and Beecroft came to his place, to measure the place where the cattle killing case occurred; at the Police Court witness
swore that the distance was 50 yards, but j Rogers told him to make it 30 yards closer, and he agreed to alter his evidence at the Sessions; saw Rogers again when he brought out the subpoenas; Rogers on the Sunday evening, when Cobcroft was with him, threatened to lock witness and his wife up and give them 15 years if they did not give the evidence he wanted ; when Rogers served the subpoenaes, he told witness and his missus to be sure amd go against Hayes, Shepherd, and Reynolds; the evidence witness gave at the Sessions was false; Cob croft offered him a pound to swear Jippy Reynolds life away; both Cobcroft and Rogers asked him to be sure to stick to the same story ; Cobcroft said if witness did not do this, Reynolds, Hayes, and Shep herd would have an action against him and Rogers ; the accused were not at his place after the Quarter Sessions; did not get anything except beef, flour, tea, and sugar from Rogers and Cobcroft after the Ses sions ; received flour, tea, and sugar twice a week from Rogers, and beef as often as he liked from Cobcroft; Rogers did not keep a store, but got the supplies from Smith, at Wilbsrforce; knew Jasper Reynolds; Cobcroft told witness after the Sessions not to be giving any false state ments to Jasper Reynolds about him and Rogers; to-day was not the first time he bad sworn that the evidence given by him in the cattle-killing case was untrue.
Mr Kiley asked if Dupcomb ever made a
declaration, and Mr Bull objected. Mr Kiley paid he did not want the contents. Mr Bull said that his friend wanted to get in certain evidence by a side wind.
Witness (continuing) said Rogers and Cobcroft had not assisted him in any other way than that indicated.
Cross-examined by Mr Bull: He was not over-flush with mouey £ and had not been well off for a long time ; had been living with Sarah Hand ior 17 years and had a family of six ; had always been able to pay his way, and was not^dependant on charity; did not bother much about the £10 Cobcroft promised him ; asked for it, but could not get it; had never been in a court-house till the cattle killing case came on ; when Cobcroft and Rogers made the promise, Sarah, Elizabeth, Mary Jane Hand and
himself were present; only himself and j
Sarah Hand were asked to give evidence;! would not swear that Cobcroft was keeping j a butcher's shop 14 or 16 months ago ; was on the ground when the Jury at the sessions viewed the locality where the cattle were killed, and pointed out to the Jury the different positions occupied by him when he saw the 'outrage; he pointed out a tree to which it was said the old cow had been tied , up, and showed them a mark where it ap peared that the cow had struck the tree; neither Cobcroft or Rogers were there when the Jury were inspecting thejlocality, but it was a portion of the arrangement that he should tell those lies to the jury; Rogers told the jury to go out and have a look at the place ; the three accused got their sentence, but they were not found guilty; after sentence had been passed the jury in
spected the locality; all that he swore at. both courts was false; he was told by Rogers and Cobcroft everything he had to say; did not remember the month or year when the
Quarter Sessions were held ; [witness here; refused to answer a question, but the Bench ordered him to do so] ; it was part of his
arrangement with Rogers and Cobcroft to j tell lies to the Judge, Mr Burcher and Mr j
Richardson if they asked him questions; did not complain to the police about his life being threatened, and did not ask protection; did not swear at the Quarter Sessions that his life had been threatened; his memory
was a bad one, and could not remember! things long; it was 13 or 14 months ago since he made a statement referred to by Mr Kiley; did not remember describing to the Judge where he stood when the cattle were killed ; he said then that he was stand ing against a gum-tree, and he WAS standing there ; Rogers told him to say he was standing there ; he could see from that tree the cow tied up by a rope; he saw Perce Reynolds with an axe, a,nd he hit the old cow with it; Dave Hayes and Shepherd
were there at the time.
Witness here turned to the Bench and said " All this is false that I'm telling."
Mr Bull said that witness had distinctly sworn as true what he had just been saying, and an oath was not to be tampered with in this way.
Mr Primrose said that if the witness tampered with the Court, they would deal with him in the proper way.
Witness (continuing) said that what he had said at the Quarter Sessions and had repeated just then was what Rogers had told him to say ; he did not know what he was swearing ; anybody standing at the tree referred to could see a cow tied up to the tree opposite ; he had never tried, because he had never stood there ; nobody had ever offered him money to say that Rogers and Cobcroft killed the cattle; knew a man named McKinnon; did not remember McKinnon and Jasper Reynolds coming to him, asking him to help Percy out of hie trouble ; they never did, and never offered him a saddle and bridle ; he never told any body that they did; that .was quite as true as all his evidence; never was in Linsley's shop; never made a statement before Mr Linsley, as a magistrate, that both Jasper Reynolds and McKinnon came to him on the night of December 12, 1894, asking him to settle the matter and get Percy out of his trouble ; neither Reynolds or McKinnon offered him a saddle and bridle to make that statement; they did not ask him to say that it was Rogers and Cobcroft who killed the cattle ; never told Mr Linsley that Cob croft gave him £10 ; would swear he did not make his mark to a declaration before Mr Linsley on 15th December, 1894, to the following effect:-" Windsor, December 15, 1894. On the 12th December Jasper Reynolds and McKinnon came to us at Currency Creek, and asked us to settle our difficulties and get Percy Reynolds out, aud
offered us a saddle and bridle to swear that they were not the guilty persons, but that Rogers amd Cobcroft had killed the cattle. Also that Cobcroft had offered us £10 to give false evidence against Percy Reynolds, Hayes and Shepherd."
(Dr. Callaghan here took his seat).
Witness .(continuing)Whilst Reynolds, Shepherd and Hayet in gaol witueSs was working for Jasper Reynolds; never had a
case until that day ; had told him that all his (witness*) evidtiice at the Sessions was a pack of lies, and that he had been put up to it by Cobcroft and Rogers. [Mr Jjiusley here entered the Court, and after' some hesitation the witness identified him]
saw Percy Reynolds when he came, out of gaol; di<i nut spesi!< to him about the case, or express bunow for having put him away ; three weeks aitor the Quarter Sessions he went to Sydney wiih Sarah Hand and saw Crick and Meagher ; <^'d not speak to any one before he went; Rogers was the Police officer who had charge of the case against Reynolds, Shepherd and Hayes.
To Mr. Baker: Witness gave evidence respecting the losing of the cattle and find ing them in the water-hole ; knew nothing about the killing of the cattle ; was present when Rogers and Beecroft made measure ments at the scene of the cattle-killing: at
the Police Court he swore that he was at
a gum-tree 50 yards away from the water hole, and at the Quarter Sessions he swore that he was at a tree 30 yards away ; Rogers told him to alter the distance from 50 to 30; the 30 yards tree was really the one he stood at; would swear Gobcroft was there when the cattle were found and pulled out; after the cattle-killing Cobcroft came up to his (witness') place, and Rogers was not with him till-after; vthatwas jibe Sun day aftet the cattle wer6 found ; didn't remember making a declaration to the effect that it was oh the Sunday three weeks after the cattle were found; if he said so, it was true ; but they came to him on the Sunday after; he did not tell lies at the Police Court about the three men convicted; it was Rogers' and Cobcroft's doings; did not complain to "Constable Rogers that he was afraid of living at Currency Creek ; Rogers gave him a gun to protect himself; did not beg of Constable Rogers for tea and sugar long before the cattle-killing case ; never asked Cobcroft for the £10 he promised.
To Mr Kiley : Did not actually see Rey
nolds strike the cow with an axe.
Mr Bull: What a liar the man must be.
Mr Kiley: I don't think that a proper re mark to make, Mr. Bull.
Mr Bull: Well, I won't withdraw a word
of it.
The Court then adjourned for lunch, and -on resuming,
Elizabeth Hand was cabled and said she had never been married ; saw defendants at her daughter's house on a Sunday some time ago; heard Cobcroft ask her daughter to give evidence against Shepherd," Hayes and Perce Reynolds; her daughter said she knew nothing about the cattle, and Cobcroft said, " If you do I'll give you £10" ; Rogers then rode up, and Cobcroft said to him, " You'll not be particular to a pound or two ?" Rogers said " No" ; saw Rogers speaking to her two daughters, and he said he had been buying tickets for them to go down on the steamer-this was in reply to a question of witness's as to what kept her daughters ; gave evidence in favor of Hayes, Shepherd and Reynolds at the Sessions.
(To Mr Bull: Did not think that Rogers and Cobcroft could have seen her that Sun day ; she was in a calf-pen, cleaning it out; she was not in her own verandah; believed it was between 3 and 4: she did not come out ot the calf-pen, because she had not her Sunday clothes on; she had no boots on; had not been offered £10 by anyone ; would tell the truth without £10; Rogers wasn't five yards away when Cobcroft offered her daughter £10; she made a statement at Crick and Meagher's office, at a different time to that made by her daughter ; Sarah Hand could not have said that the conver sation about the £10 was between Cobcroft and herself, and not Dumcombe-it was not true; it was three weeks from the time the cattle were found to the time of the conversation about the £10; she did npt think it was three weeks ; [Mr Bull here said that he was not sure, but h« thought a system of telegraphy was being carried on between the witness and some persons in the Court, for he noticed that the witness, after making certain statements, looked round the Court and then changed her evidence. He did not wish to insinuate that there was anything wrong with the Court] ; it might have been three weeks; would not svrear that she had fixed the time as three weeks in her declaration ; would not swear that Reynolds, Hayes and Shepherd were not actually in gaol at the time of the excursion for which phe said
Rogers bought the tickets for her girls. [Mr Bull here questioned witness with reference to certain evidence given by her at the Quarter Sessions, and obtained an admis sion to the effect that she heard Duncombe say to Sarah Hand, " Do you remember the shot on Sunday night-Hayes shot them."]
To Mr. Baker: Had five daughters ; it was Hot . true that Mary Jane walked out with Perce Reynolds ; . went to Sydney with Mercy Ann Hayes;. paid lier own fare.
^ sfcT was a single
woman; gave evidence agaihst Reynolds,
«hM
evidence, one Sunday, three weeks after the cattle.were killed, Arthur Coborofl rode up and .said, "You know something about those cattle," and witness said she did cot: witness then corroborated the evidence re garding the of £10, &c, made toy Duncomb: the offer was made by Cobcroft, and wu refused by witness, who then whistled for Constable Rogers; Cobcroft then told Rogers that he had offered the £10, and said to Rogers, " You won't be particular to a pound or two; Rogers said "No;" Rogers threatened to lock her up when she
I reftfsed; on the following Wednesday
Rogers served her with a subpoena to at tend the Court on the following Friday; Bhe came to the Court and gave evidence for the prosecution; {Mr. Kiley sought here to put in the police court depositions, but Mr. Bull objected] ; the evidence she gave at the police court was false ; after this, Constable Rogers again saw her, having come with Beecroft to measure the distance from the rails to where the cattle
were found; Sogers came along afterwards again and read to her and Duncomb the depositions ; Rogers' son drove them into Windsor, and Cobcroft was with them ; he promised that they would never go short, and he kept his promise, giving them eat ables, &c, for two or three months; got meat from Cobcroft; Cobcroft told her what to feay in her evidence; all her evi dence on both occasions was untrae, and Cobcroft could not stand up with aolear conscience and say different; sever re ceived the £10; spoke to Jasper Reynolds about the case, and on the following Sun day Rogers oame to her and told her that if he caught her talking with Jasper Reynolds or any of the Reynolds' he'd look her up: later on Cobcroft said, "I believe you've been down to Mr, Richardson at Parra mattawitness said, " I was notCob croft said, " I know you've been to Sydney or some place ; I'm going to get married nest month, and then I'll he able to give you something if you won't turn round on Rogers and me"; she was offered a pound if she would get something up against Jasper Reynolds and get rid of him from Wilberforce.
, ®ul1: No one ever suggested to
ber that Rogers and Cobcroft killed the cattle; did not make a declaration before
^ Kinsley, J.P.. in Windsor, on
15th December, in company with Dun comb . did not make the declaration read (and which is referred to elsewhere); had not been at Linsley's shop for eight years until a month ago.
| Mary Jane Hand corroborated portion of
the evideace relating to the offer of £10 bv Cobcroft. J
To Mr Bull: Had never been asked by Cobcroft or Rogers to take false oath; and had never been offered anything by them; witness also corroborated certain evidence givec by her at the Sessions; it was to the effect that Duncomb had told her that Hayes shot the cattle.
To Mr Baker: She went to Orick and Meaghers with Archibald Reynolds: she was not sorry that Reynolds got into gaol.
i his was the case for the prosecution.
Air Bull submitted that it was hardly worth while for him to address the Benoh on the legal aspect of the case. The prose cution would be a good thing for the dis trict, because it would settle a vexed ques tion. After hearing the evidence no one
£. 1"wM would have the audacity to
think that 12 sensible men would eonviot
two men like Cobcroft and Rogers on the testimony of such characters as they -had had in the box that day. There was the evidence of Duncomb, who, when he was thoroughly cornered, started to tell the truth to the Bench, but turned again,, and at the instance of some signs from persons in the Court, proceeded to state that his story was false; He was sorry that there were men in his profession who would take up such disreputable cases. The last witness told the truth as far as she dared to do so. It would only be an insult to the Bench s and his own intelligence if he did other than ask for a dismissal of the case.
Faxmer Linsley, J. P., was here called, and deposed that he knew Duncombe ana Sarah Hand; remembered them call lhgon bitn aud making a statement s him which was taken down in writing; it was signed by their mark by these two persons, and countersigned by himself as a magis trate; Sarah Hand dictated it; Cobcroft was there ; remembered that the statement was to the effect that Jasper Reynolds came to their house and wanted them to make it up and get the men in gaol out and to swear that Cobcroft ana
killed the cattle: she said that they (she and Duncomb) had been offered a saddle and bridle to swear this ; the document was
read over to both of them ; the document
produced was the one signed before him (witness); it was signed in his shop.
Hp I submitted that the case should
be sent on to a jury for trial. The attention
to decide was whether a pnma fa?ie case
U*£****
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II ' '! '
of sight altogether the evidence of David 3}uncoqrf> and Sarah Hand, they had still lhe: evidence of the old woman herself, which had not been shaken in any one par ticular. By dismissing that information, their Worships would render it necessary foe the witnesses to be prosecuted for perjury.
. The Bench dismissed the case, and the Chairman said they would recommend the prosecution of the Hands and Duncomb for
pequry.
The result was received with applause, which was suppressed.
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1901
DIVORCE COURT.
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(Before Mr. Justice Walker.)
COBCROFT v. COBCROFT (part heard.)
Mr. C. A. Walker (agent for Mr. William Walker and Son, of Windsor) appeared for Eliza Ellen Cob- croft, formerly McQuade, who sought for a dissolu- tion of her marriage with Arthur Cobcroft on the ground of repeated assaults and cruel beatings. Respondent appeared on his own behalf.
Henry Day, an orchardist residing at Windsor, said he stayed at the Commercial Hotel kept by the peti- tioner and respondent for three months. Respondent was very abusive in his language to the petitioner, and in his threats. He threatened to shoot her on one occasion, and on another threatened to stab her with a carving knife. On one occasion he had a carving knife in his hand, and he said he would rip her up. Petitioner showed witness her arms, and they were dark with bruises. He had heard respon dent use very bad language at the dining-table, and had seen people leave the table in consequence of the language used by the respondent.
This closed the petitioner's case.
Respondent then went into the box, and absolutely denied the truth of the evidence given against him that day. He said he never ill-treated his wife. He had quarrelled with her. When he left Windsor he parted from his wife on the very best terms. He asserted fearlessly that the main part of the evidence given against him was a "concoction of fabrications." He had maintained his wlfe, and a few weeks before his arrest he gave her a cheque for £30. Shortly afterwards he gave her £4. Every shilling he could lay his hands on he gave to his wife.
Mr. Walker : Mrs Cobcroft was the proprietress of the Commercial Hotel at Winsor when you
married her ?
Respondent: Yes.
And she owned all the furniture ? — Yes.
You brought no money into the hotel ? — Yes, I
did.
How much ? — That's my business, and not yours.
Petitioner, re-examined, said that with regard to the £30 cheque given to her by the respondent it was the result of the sale by the respondent of a mare belonging to her.
Mr. Walker : Did respondent bring any money
into tho hotel ?
Petitioner : Not one penny, for he had no money.
He was a butcher, and said he had £70 to collect, but he never collected one penny of it. She sup- ported respondent, and the hotel had been hers ever since his arrest. According to the law she had to get the license put in the name of her husband, but since he was arrested she had the license transferred back to herself. She did not know where re-
spondent got the £4 which he gave to her.
Will you explain the statement of Constable
Taafe that you kissed the respondent in Windsor Gaol ? — When respondent was arrested he was taken to Windsor Gaol. She was very much upset, as any woman would be, at her husband being taken up, and felt very sorry. She did not like to see any one in gaol. Respondent sent for her and she went to see him. When coming out of the gaol respondent caught hold of her and kissed her 50 times. She did not go up to respondent, and put her arms around
him. It was he who did so.
The respondent then addressed the Court.
His Honor said the evidence of the petitioner was detailed and specific, and had been corroborated by her witnesses. Against that there was the simple denial of the respondent, who said the evidence was a tissue of fabrications, and that the case had been trumped up against him. Respondent was evidently a man of low mind and violent temper, and instead of controlling his temper had allowed it to control him. The result was the petitioner's home was made intolerable by his exhibitions of violence. The re-
spondent had been guilty of cruelty, and on that ground he had not the slightest hesitation in saying that the petitioner had proved her case. Therefore, he pronounced a decree nisi, returnable in one month.

1920
LAUGHTER CAUSES DEATH.
SYDNEY, Sunday. Mr. Arthur. Cob- croft, living at Leichhardt, picked up a newspaper of a 1915 date, and was com paring the prices of various commodities with those of to-day. He suddenly burst into laughter at the great difference. He appeared to be unable to control himself, anti eventually collapsed and diedl. A doc- tor pronounced that death was due to heart failure, caused by excessive laughter. Mr. Cobcroft, was well known as a trainer of coursing


644. Agnes Hilda Gronbald Cobcroft


PLEASANT PEOPLE.
In Sydney on Saturday night last an elderly man and a barmaid had words in a Darlington street. The
woman, Agnes Cobcroft. ran away screaming with a razor slash in her throat. A young fellow who assisted
her towards hospital robbed her of her handbag and money. Subsequentlly the body of Alban Martineera, 59,
retired publican, was found at his home, with his throat cut, and a razor nearby.
Source: The Charleville Times 24 Jun 1938


Eliza Ellen Harris

Divorced 1901


164. Harvie Cobcroft

Divorced 1898

Secretary Victoria Racing Club


1913
IîsT BANKRUPTCY.
(Before the Registrar, Mi Salusbury )
CERTiriC Y TE APPLICATION
Re HarAio Cobcroft Adjourned td April 10
PUBLIC EXAMINATION
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The death occurred last night at the Hotel Arcadia, after a brief illness, of Mr. Harvie Cobcroft, Secretary of the Victoria Park Rac- ing Club, aged 53 years. Mr. Cobcroft, who was one of the best known racing secretaries in the State, was born in Windsor, NSW. Mr Cobcroft only became ill on Wednesday, and he passed away at 9.30 last evening.
The funeral will leave Wood Coffill's mor- tuary, George-street, for South Head Ceme- tary, at 3.15 p m. to-day.
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170. Leslie Thomas "Tepper" Cobcroft

Divorced from Alice in 1903

1938 ??? NOT SURE IF THIS ONE

DIES I
IN NEW ZEALAND
WELLINGTON (N.Z.), Wednesday. - The dea
The death has occurred of L. T. Cobcroft, well known as the former New Zealand and New South Wales cricketer. He had captained both New Zealand and New South Wales teams. He was aged 74 years. _____________

OLD CRICKETER'S DEATH.
Captain of New South Wales and
New Zealand.
A cablegram from our Wellington (N.Z.) correspondent reports the death of Mr. L. T. Cobcroft, at the age of 74 years. He earned the distinction of captaining both New South Wales and New Zealand at cricket.
Mr. Cobcroft captained the Ivanhoe team in Sydney before the days of senior cricket, and later he led Glebe in the district competi- tion. Glebe was then a strong team. Cob- croft was a good batsman and fieldsman, a
fair bowler, and a fine captain. In 1895-6
he was captain of the team which the New
South Wales Cricket Association sent, on a
tour of New Zealand. He later lived in New
Zealand, and a few years after his tour with the New South Wales team, he captained New
Zealand on a visit to Australia.
On his retirement from active play he per- formed coaching duties and also was a pro- minent umpire, officiating in several interna- tional matches. He visited Sydney early in the present season, and attended matches at the Sydney Cricket Ground.